Warren Robbins can say something his late parents wanted to reveal but never could: his sister, Barbara, who died in the service of her country, was working for the CIA. 9NEWS at 10 p.m. 03/29/15.
Kyle Clark, KUSA 10:35 p.m. MDT March 29, 2015Barbara Robbins died in the Viet Cong bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, Vietnam 50 years ago Monday(Photo: Courtesy)DENVER – Warren Robbins can say something his late parents wanted to reveal but never could: his sister, Barbara, who died in the service of her country, was working for the CIA.Barbara Robbins, then 21, died in the Viet Cong bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, Vietnam 50 years ago Monday.That was March 30, 1965. Newspapers in Colorado and across the country mourned the death of the State Department secretary. The Central Intelligence Agency didn’t publicly acknowledge she was one of their own until 2011.Robbins’ parents, a butcher and a homemaker, didn’t live to see the day. Her only sibling, Warren Robbins, now lives in Aurora.”You can make anybody that passed a martyr,” Warren Robbins said. “I don’t want Barbara to be a martyr. I just want people to think about her once in a while.”Press reports of the day say Robbins heard a commotion on the street in front of the embassy and stepped to a window for a closer look. The car bomb exploded. Twenty were killed. Barbara was one of two Americans.In the hours that followed, arrivals at the Robbins home in Colorado included a telegram from President Lyndon B. Johnson and an agent from the CIA.”It didn’t occur to me that she worked for the CIA,” Warren Robbins said.The true nature of her clandestine work is still a mystery. Robbins says he believes his sister was simply a secretary. But for decades, the CIA refused to declassify her service, citing “cover considerations.””What does that mean?” Robbins said. “She wasn’t out spying on this and that. I’m sure she saw some top secret documents, yeah. But I don’t know.”And, he insists, it doesn’t really matter.He prefers his sister … – Click Here To Visit Article Source