denver colorado marijuana real estate

By Phillip Smith

In many ways, ours is harsh, moralistic, and punitive society. One need only look at our world-leading incarceration rate to see the evidence. We like to punish wrongdoers, and our conception of wrongdoers often includes those who are doing no direct wrong to others, but who are doing things of which we don’t approve.

We label those people of whom we don’t approve. When it comes to drugs and drug use, the labels are all too familiar: Heroin users are “fucking junkies;” alcohol abusers are “worthless drunks;” cocaine smokers are “crack heads;” stimulant users are “tweakers;” people with prescription drug habits are “pill poppers.” The disdain and the labeling even extends to the use of drugs on the cusp of mainstream acceptance. Marijuana users are “stoners” or “pot heads” or “couch potatoes.”

Such labeling — or stigmatizing — defines those people as different, not like us, capital-O Other. It dehumanizes the targeted population. And that makes it more socially and politically feasible to define them as threats to the rest of us and take harsh actions against them. It’s a pattern that we’ve seen repeatedly in the drug panics that sweep the nation on a regular basis. Drug users are likened to disease vectors or dangerous vermin that must be repressed, eradicated, wiped out to protect the rest of us.

(It is interesting in this regard to ponder the response to the most recent wave of opiate addiction, where, for the first time, users are being seen as “our sons and daughters,” not debauched decadents or scary people of color who live in inner cities. Yes, the impulse to punish still exists, but it is now attenuated and superseded by calls for access to treatment.)

Never mind that such attitudes can be counterproductive. Criminalizing and punishing injection drug use has not, for …read more