In King Lear, when the Duke of Albany said, “Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well,” he was not speaking about his experiences as the general manager of an NBA team. The fundamental idea there, however, is one that many NBA franchises have been heaving away at with great force: “Perfect is the enemy of good”
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Consider some recent examples. Last year’s Indiana Pacers, fresh off of giving the Miami Heat hell in a seven-game Eastern Conference Finals, looked poised to make a championship run. In the name of taking that next step, they acquired big man Andrew Bynum midseason and traded away the little-used Danny Granger for Evan Turner. Sure, they finished as the Number One seed in the East and played Miami tough in the Conference Finals yet again, but along the way they lost something integral. They were just not the same team.
Last season’s Phoenix Suns were everyone’s favorite feel-good story: a team that was supposed to be one of the league’s worst playing with grit and determination under first-year coach Jeff Hornacek, even challenging for a playoff spot in the rugged West. Prior to this season, everyone was wondering who would be this year’s Suns – the young, weird team that would make everyone believe. But after making the most of Goran Dragic and Eric Bledsoe in the backcourt, Phoenix signed Isaiah Thomas, created a logjam, and eventually had to unload both Dragic and Thomas at the deadline. What was once one of the league’s funnest teams now seems like a cranky mess.
Teams are constantly working to find an edge, but the pace and scale of their moves has seemed particularly outsized this year. There were the Sacramento Kings, who got off to a surprising 9-5 start, then cooled off once DeMarcus Cousins missed a chunk of time with viral meningitis. The team responded by firing head coach Mike Malone, who was largely seen as instrumental in getting Cousins to produce like an early season MVP. Under interim coach Tyrone Corbin they went 7 … – Click Here To Visit Article Source